how are you

seriously

How are you, asks one character or another on almost every episode of both our latest binge-watch series.  (Coming Up With Better Questions)

Sometimes two and three times during a single episode, one character approaches a person who has either witnessed or experienced a horrific crime scene, accident, or another traumatic event, asking, “How are you?”

You have to ask?(!)

 The reply is without fail, “I am fine.”  I just saw the unimaginable happen and I am fine, thanks for asking. 

Just once, though, I wish a character would stagger away from a catastrophe, speechless, and those approaching her, or him, would have the good sense to silence their inquisitiveness!

 But, then,  who would solve the crimes, or restore a modicum of order to the chaos which we too often take for granted, if they were not FINE, just fine?

Or, maybe the fictional question and response  is code for us to understand the characters are  compassionate and competent — which so many first responders are.  Like the teams of responders who working round the clock in Florida: (911 Calls Released from Condiminum Collapse)

These people can’t really be . . . fine!

Yet, they and so many others soldier on. 

 A serendipitous reminder  — a morning prayer penned by Patsy Clairmont reminded me to be fine, just for today:

 Breath at Daybreak, resuscitate my courage to enter the demand-strewn path ahead.Help me not to pick up problems before they materialize.When I hit a dead end, help me not to camp out there.When I encounter a difficult person, help me not to join their fraternity.And when I am that person, remind me that it cost You for my freedom and forgiveness.Amen

She also advised: Life is hard enough — DON’T BE DIFFICULT! — especially on a hot humid day in July. 

Maybe that’s why fictional and real-life heroes choose to say they are fine . . .  God help me to at least ASK someone, and wait for the answer. 

How are you, dear friend?

Me, too.

how are you

a simple blessing

Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2021 Barbara Smith

Thanks for sharing!